Welcome Too Late at Kunsthal Charlottenborg

Artists: Iain Ball, Tue Greenfort, Marguerite Humeau, Parker Ito, Katja Novitskova, Eduardo Terrazas, Anne de Vries

Exhibition title: Welcome Too Late

Curated by: Toke Lykkeberg

Venue: Kunsthal Charlottenborg, Copenhagen, Denmark

Date: March 18 – May 28, 2017

Photography: all images copyright and courtesy of the artists and Kunsthal Charlottenborg

While everything from climate change to techno-scientific developments is marked by acceleration and exponential growth, our current moment in time is increasingly hard to grasp. As the world changes at high pace, the present rapidly shrinks. There is a sentiment that the future at ever-greater speed undercuts the present; and that the present at ever- greater speed recedes into the past.

In this scenario, artists and documentarians face a new challenge. Those traditionally charged with depicting the world need to engage in this task, all the while the world and our knowledge about it transform into something else. The artists in this exhibition all deal with this challenge in various ways. Instead of trying to zoom in on and keep up with time, there is a tendency to zoom out. Art and film are less and less ‘contemporary’, i.e. with time, and more and more ‘extemporary’, i.e. out of time.

The present is not grasped as a moment, but as part of a grand continuum of universal and natural history. The so-called ‘end of the grand narratives’ is now making room for even bigger, more dizzying narratives that do not stick to a linear timeline. This exhibition does not focus on the current state of the world, but rather its course.

Welcome Too Late unfolds as a small journey from our intense present toward some ethereal time and space beyond it. The first gallery is haunted by the spirit of the French impressionist painter Claude Monet, who – at the turn of the last century – was chasing the present, while painting his unruly garden: “I am just running after nature without being able to catch her up”. The following galleries present works that exit the present much like the author H.G. Wells imagined it. In his science fiction novel The Time Machine from 1895, he suggested that man could “move about in time” in the manner a balloon defies gravity.

Iain Ball, (Rare Earth Sculptures) Terbium, 2015. Raw bay mud, printed plastic, Red Lizard Mustika Pearl – type C1 (IND33), CNC milled aluminum, stainless steel, Vibe-Tribe troll 2.0 10W Bluetooth Vibration resonance speaker, GOCH – Terbium Energy Catalyst (QNSOO1) Quantum Natives / Energy Pangea, Terbium Dark Psy Energy Pack, aluminum, water. Installation view, Kunsthal Charlottenborg, 2017. Photo by Anders Sune Berg

Welcome Too Late, 2017, installation view from Kunsthal Charlottenborg

Welcome Too Late, 2017, installation view from Kunsthal Charlottenborg

Anne de Vries, Forecast, 2011. HD video 5.04 min. Installation view from Kunsthal Charlottenborg, 2017. Photography by Anders Sune Berg

Katja Novitskova, Expansion Curves (fire worship, purple horns), 2016. Digital print on pet-g, digital print on aluminum dibond, plexiglass. Installation view, Kunsthal Charlottenborg, 2017. Photo by Anders Sune Berg.

Marguerite Humeau, Gisant 1, 2016. Polystyrene, fibreglass, resin, white paint, acrylic parts, latex, nylon, speaker, hardware, sound, powder-coated metal stand. Installation view, Kunsthal Charlottenborg, 2017. Photo by Anders Sune Berg

Marguerite Humeau, Gisant 1, 2016. Polystyrene, fibreglass, resin, white paint, acrylic parts, latex, nylon, speaker, hardware, sound, powder-coated metal stand. Installation view, Kunsthal Charlottenborg, 2017. Photo by Anders Sune Berg

Marguerite Humeau, Gisant 1, 2016. Polystyrene, fibreglass, resin, white paint, acrylic parts, latex, nylon, speaker, hardware, sound, powder-coated metal stand. Installation view, Kunsthal Charlottenborg, 2017. Photo by Anders Sune Berg

Welcome Too Late, 2017, installation view from Kunsthal Charlottenborg

Eduardo Terrazas, Parteaguas (Turning Point), 1975-2013. Digital print. Installation view from Kunsthal Charlottenborg, 2017. Photography by Anders Sune Berg

Eduardo Terrazas, Exponential Growth, 2014. Video 3:12 min. Installation view from Kunsthal Charlottenborg, 2017. Photography by Anders Sune Berg

Eduardo Terrazas, Exponential Growth, 2014. Video 3:12 min. Installation view from Kunsthal Charlottenborg, 2017. Photography by Anders Sune Berg

Eduardo Terrazas, Exponential Growth, 2014. Video 3:12 min. Installation view from Kunsthal Charlottenborg, 2017. Photography by Anders Sune Berg

Welcome Too Late, 2017, installation view from Kunsthal Charlottenborg

Welcome Too Late, 2017, installation view from Kunsthal Charlottenborg

Parker Ito, Western Exterminator/Kernel Kleenup/Little Man/Pesterminator, 2013-2015. (Automotive violet with parts) bronze, anodized automotive parts, automotive paint, nickel plating, hanging hardware. Installation view from Kunsthal Charlottenborg, 2017. Photography by Anders Sune Berg

Parker Ito, Western Exterminator/Kernel Kleenup/Little Man/Pesterminator, 2013-2015. (Automotive violet with parts) bronze, anodized automotive parts, automotive paint, nickel plating, hanging hardware. Installation view from Kunsthal Charlottenborg, 2017. Photography by Anders Sune Berg

Parker Ito, Western Exterminator/Kernel Kleenup/Little Man/Pesterminator, 2013-2015. (Automotive violet with parts) bronze, anodized automotive parts, automotive paint, nickel plating, hanging hardware. Installation view from Kunsthal Charlottenborg, 2017. Photography by Anders Sune Berg

Welcome Too Late, 2017, installation view from Kunsthal Charlottenborg

Welcome Too Late, 2017, installation view from Kunsthal Charlottenborg

Welcome Too Late, 2017, installation view from Kunsthal Charlottenborg

Welcome Too Late, 2017, installation view from Kunsthal Charlottenborg

Tue Greenfort, EQUILIBRIUM, 2011-2017. Different translations and editions of the book ‘The Limits to Growth’ (1972), plexiglas, wire. Installation view from Kunsthal Charlottenborg 2017. Photography by Anders Sune Berg

D.H. Meadows, D.L. Meadows, J. Randers, W.W. Behrens III ‘The Limits to Growth’, 1972

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