Hugo Scibetta at Clima

14

Artist: Hugo Scibetta

Exhibition title: All good things must come to an end

Venue: Clima, Milan, Italy

Date: December 4, 2015 – January 30, 2016

Photography: images copyright and courtesy of the artist and Clima Gallery, Milan

Clima Gallery is pleased to present the first solo show in Italy by french artist Hugo Scibetta: All good things must come to an end

For the show All good things must come to an end Hugo Scibetta presents a new body of works, in which as a digital native he questions on how an artist nowadays can relate to the stream of inputs flowing on the web, and how to focus and bring it back to materiality.

The exhibition plays with the idea of “apartment-gallery”, and it is structured in three rooms.

In the first and second room we meet the blurred series consisting of canvases and wallpapers where Scibetta – drawing inspiration from the website Contemporary Art Daily – chooses random show images and slowly enlarge them, step by step, until the whole picture becomes blurred, and then he prints it on canvas and wallpapers.

The same work is enlarged and reproduced in the form of a wall drawing on blue back paper, creating a game of perspective layers and filters that the human eye meets in between the screen and the retina. The supporting material also links with today’s super consumption of image thought the screen.

In the back room we find watercolors images, taken form a random online archive of the artist, which he just uses as landscapes playing with them: reframing them, stretching them, making the slow gesture of watercoloring, making them black & white, in the idea – like the blur – of a loss of marks.

“I chose watercolor because I think that the watercolor painter – or just landscape painter in general – is the perfect example of the notion of being here in a present moment (hic and nunc, essentiality).”

All the exhibition space is studded with chairs, two of which are part of the works from the sculpture attempt series.

These works are composed of a 3D printed reproduction of medieval amphoras, made possible due to Oliver Laric’s 3d scanning of the Lincoln Foundation Archive in New York, in a fake precarious balance between the wall and the chair. The original object is a ceramic and thus is quite fragile; yet the endless reproducibility of the 3D print cancels the original object qualities.

01

02

Hugo Scibetta, Untitled, 2015

03

Hugo Scibetta, Untitled, 2015

04

05

Hugo Scibetta, Untitled, 2015

06

Hugo Scibetta, Untitled, 2015

07

Hugo Scibetta, Untitled, 2015

08

09

10

Hugo Scibetta, 87.88.188.129, 2015

11

Hugo Scibetta, 87.88.188.129, 2015

12

Hugo Scibetta, Untitled, 2015

13

14

Hugo Scibetta, Sculpture Attempt, 2015

15

Hugo Scibetta, Sculpture Attempt, 2015

Related Post

Leave a Comment