CARTOON PHYSICS at Kerstin Engholm

lb4

Artists: Nick Bastis, Nina Beier, Liudvikas Buklys, Angie Keefer, Nicholas Matranga, Post Brothers, Anne- Mie Van Kerckhoven

Exhibition title: CARTOON PHYSICS

Curated by: Chris Fitzpatrick

Venue: Kerstin Engholm, Vienna, Austria

Date: September 11 – October 17, 2015

Photography: images copyright and courtesy of the artists and Kerstin Engholm, Vienna

The laws of physics do not apply in cartoons. If we stretch this lawless dimension off the screen, and attach its illogics to our realm, the limitless elasticity of cartoon physics offers a more fluid way of thinking about everything from the comical and sinister implications of artificial intelligence to the warped elliptical routes through which information is disseminated, from a waning anthropocentrism to the seemingly esoteric workings of speculative finance today (and whether or not today is even still a relevant temporal coordinate), and so on.

Contemporary art operates similarly. Opening 10 September 2015, Cartoon Physics is an exhibition of interdisciplinary work by Nick Bastis (US), Nina Beier (DK), Liudvikas Buklys (LT), Angie Keefer (US), Nicholas Matranga (US), Post Brothers (US), and Anne-Mie Van Kerckhoven (BE). It’s set within an alphabetized topography of nearly 2000 science fiction novels, which line the perimeter of the gallery, and which hosts a rather diverse population: 2 pairs of pink horses, mechanically printed (and misprinted) on 2 stretched canvases; a variable set of cryptic logos, silkscreened in copper on both sides of 400 gram business cards; 9 carpet samples, imbued with the psychology of sales in thick acrylic paint; a freestanding pane of teleprompter glass, offering a dual layer of opacity; 2 robotic vacuum cleaners, hacked with artificial intelligence to perform a choreography defined by the electronic noise in the air waves; snails sliming vinyl objects and storefront glass; serial posters parroting the grammar of empty metaphors that cannibalistically proliferate in stock imagery databanks; and all of this narrated by a talking head, projected in a cartoon world, where he correlates the workings of credit and financial speculation with the portable hole.

nib1

Curated by 2015

ak2

ak1

Angie Keefer, Horses, 2015

pb_2

Post Brothers, Memories Found in a Bathtub, or What Entropy Means to Me, 2006-2015

corner-09-17 um 07.54.45

pb_1

Post Brothers, Memories Found in a Bathtub, or What Entropy Means to Me, 2006-2015

nm_1

Nicholas Matranga, Was it a rat I saw, 2010

nm_2

Nicholas Matranga, Was it a rat I saw, 2010

nb_5

Nick Bastis, Divider Bell #3, 2015

anne_mie 2015-09-17 um 07.54.20

Annie-Mie Van Kerckhoven, Untitled, 1995

amvk2

amvk1

amvk9

amvk8

amvk7

amvk6

amvk5

amvk4

amvk3

nb_3

Nick Bastis, When you don’t find what you’re looking for, sleep (Eames Side Chair), 2014

nb_2

nb_1

Nick Bastis, When you don’t find what you’re looking for, sleep (Hee Welling Bar Stool), 2014
Nick Bastis, When you don’t find what you’re looking for, sleep (IKEA Flintan Chair), 2014
Nick Bastis, When you don’t find what you’re looking for, sleep (Le Corbusier Swivel Chair), 2014

lb6

lb5

Liudvikas Buklys, Prototypes for secondary schools, 2015

lb4

Liudvikas Buklys, Roombas like snails 1, 2013

lb3

lb2

lb1

Liudvikas Buklys, Roombas like snails 2, 2013

pb_nb

nb_9

Nick Bastis, When you don’t find what you’re looking for, sleep, 2015

nb_6

Nick Bastis, When you don’t find what you’re looking for, sleep, 2015

nb_8

Nick Bastis, When you don’t find what you’re looking for, sleep, 2015

nb_7

Nick Bastis, When you don’t find what you’re looking for, sleep, 2015

post 07.55

Post Brothers, The Hole Idea, 2015

Related Post

Leave a Comment